UN warns that Taliban are already carrying out executions, recruiting children and oppressing women

The United Nations warned Taliban It is already carrying out massive human rights violations in Afghanistan Including “summary executions” of civilians, child recruitment and restrictions on the rights of women and girls.

High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet urged the Human Rights Council to take “bold and strong action” after the Taliban’s stunning power grab raised fears they would return the country to the brutal rule they imposed when they were last in power.

Taliban leaders have promised to restore security and have tried to show an image of moderation, but many Afghans are skeptical and rushing to leave the country, leading to chaos at Kabul International Airport.

The United Nations has warned that the Taliban are already carrying out grave abuses in Afghanistan, including “summary executions” of civilians.

Afghan children leave school after a semester in Zabul as the Taliban begin implementing their new system

Afghan children leave school after a semester in Zabul as the Taliban begin implementing their new system

Amid scattered reports, it has been difficult to determine how widespread the abuses are and whether they reflect Taliban leaders saying one thing and doing another, or if fighters on the ground are taking matters into their own hands.

Leaders of the Group of Seven nations plan to meet later on Tuesday to discuss the worsening refugee crisis and the collapse of the Afghan government amid debate over whether a full US troop withdrawal could be extended beyond the end of the month to allow more time to evacuate those desperate. Leaves.

US administration officials declined to say whether an extension was possible or feasible given that a Taliban spokesman warned that August 31 was a “red line” and that an extension of the US presence would “provoke a reaction.”

On Tuesday, Bachelet called for strong action to investigate reports of rights abuses, as she sought to ensure that international interest in the country did not wane.

“At this critical moment, the Afghan people are looking to the Human Rights Council to defend and protect their rights,” she said.

“I urge this Council to take bold and strong action, commensurate with the gravity of this crisis, by establishing a dedicated mechanism to closely monitor the evolution of the human rights situation in Afghanistan.”

High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet (pictured) urged the Human Rights Council to take 'bold and strong action'

High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet (pictured) urged the Human Rights Council to take ‘bold and strong action’

When the Taliban last ruled Afghanistan in the late 1990s, the group largely confined women to their homes

When the Taliban last ruled Afghanistan in the late 1990s, the group largely confined women to their homes

Bachelet was referring to the “mechanism” of the council possibly appointing a commission of inquiry, a special rapporteur or a fact-finding mission on the situation in Afghanistan.

Bachelet cited reports of “brief executions” of civilians and former security forces no longer fighting, child recruitment, and restrictions on women’s rights to move freely and for girls to go to school. She cited the suppression of peaceful protests and expressions of dissent.

Bachelet did not specify the time frame she was referring to or the source of her reports.

Days ago, a Norway-based private intelligence group providing information to the United Nations said it had obtained evidence that the Taliban had arrested Afghans on a blacklist of people they believe worked in key roles with the former Afghan administration or with US-led forces. Many Afghans are in hiding, saying they fear such reprisals.

Bachelet cited reports of

Bachelet cited reports of “brief executions” of civilians and former security forces who stopped fighting, child soldiers, and restrictions on women’s rights.

When the Taliban last ruled Afghanistan in the late 1990s, the group largely confined women to their homes, banned television and music, cut off the hands of suspected thieves and carried out public executions.

Bachelet noted that Taliban leaders recently pledged to respect the rights of women, girls and ethnic minorities and to refrain from reprisals.

“The onus is now entirely on the Taliban to translate these commitments into reality,” she told the 47-member State Council, the United Nations’ highest human rights body.

Council member states have reached a joint resolution, likely to be accepted unanimously, which falls far short of calls from some advocacy groups to appoint a human rights expert to monitor the situation.

It only invites Bachelet’s office to release a report early next year only.

She stressed that indulging in human rights violations would “undermine the legitimacy of the perpetrators, whether towards the people, regional and international institutions and other countries.”

“The primary red line will be the Taliban’s treatment of women and girls,” she said, urging “respect for their rights to freedom, freedom of movement, education, self-expression and employment.”

Nasir Ahmad Andisha, the Afghan ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva appointed under the now-collapsed government of former President Ashraf Ghani and who continues to represent his country, has made clear he wants to see strong action.

Taliban leaders have promised to restore security and have tried to show an image of moderation, but many Afghans are skeptical

Taliban leaders have promised to restore security and have tried to show an image of moderation, but many Afghans are skeptical

He urged council members to deliver a “strong message to all parties, including the Taliban, that violations and abuses of human rights … will have consequences.”

Rights groups had called on the council to form an international fact-finding mission to assess the situation on the ground and seek to document violations, including war crimes and crimes against humanity, with the aim of ensuring accountability.

But a draft resolution submitted on Monday to the council only recommended that Bachelet report on the state of rights in Afghanistan during the council’s main annual session next March, drawing condemnation.

According to several diplomatic sources, a number of countries that would have pushed to move forward with the resolution have held back, fearing that a stronger reaction would anger the Taliban and jeopardize access to evacuations from the country.

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