Tom Ford criticizes cancellation culture for ‘discouraging design’ and misses when other cultures can be celebrated

That was said by Tom Ford cancel culture “Design is forbidden” because “everything is now considered personalization” and designers can no longer “celebrate other cultures.”

The 60-year-old fashion icon said of the phenomenon: “Culture disallows design because instead of feeling free, the trend is to start being constrained by a set of rules. Everything is now considered a takeover. We were able to celebrate other cultures. Now you can’t do that.

He also blamed social media for making the designs look “increasingly cartoonish,” according to Watchman.

Instagram has broken the rules. People dress up to take pictures of themselves to post online, everything is exaggerated — especially the eyebrow,” Ford told the news site.

He remembers a time when celebrities took “bigger risks” because they didn’t have designers in their ears who admitted he missed it.

Tom Ford (photographed at the 2021 Met Gala), 60, said the culture of cancellation has caused designers to ‘adhere to a set of rules’, and he is nostalgic for times when ‘celebs might take more risks’

Texas-born Ford has worn the costumes of Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez (photographed together at the CFDA Fashion Awards in 2019), Tom Hanks, Johnny Depp, and Ryan Gosling among other notable Hollywood celebrities

Texas-born Ford has worn the costumes of Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez (photographed together at the CFDA Fashion Awards in 2019), Tom Hanks, Johnny Depp, and Ryan Gosling among other notable Hollywood celebrities

Ford admitted that red carpets and A-lister appearances have all become “a little bit monolithic” thanks to agents and managers dictating what stars should wear on their outings for fear of cancellation.

However, Ford, who was the honorary chair at the 2021 Met Gala, made a rather minor show when walking the red carpet at fashion’s biggest night.

He wore a classic all-black suit with a velvet jacket, leather shoes, tie and sunglasses.

“Oh my gosh my taste in celebs? Well, I like celebrities in general because they are not afraid of fashion.

They need fashion. They need, when they walk the red carpet, to get attention, so as not to be intimidated. They will take much greater risks. It’s great to see a celebrity get dressed up.”

When asked what he thinks of celebrities—more specifically their shadow stylists, dubbed “the most powerful people in Hollywood”—that dictate style trends, Ford replied, “I wish they were less powerful, I must say.”

He used the 70s as an example when stars didn’t have stylists and took “more risks” in their wardrobe. Besides the stakes, the era is marked by tie-dyed shirts, “peasant” blouses and bell-bottom jeans.

If you look at old Oscar photos, before celebrities had designers, and my god, people are taking more risks. There were great things going on the red carpet then.

Model wearing gray Tropme-L'oeil track pants featuring a cropped exposed boxer built above the waistband

The style became popular in hip-hop culture during the 1990s

Designed by prominent Spanish fashion brand Balenciaga, the gray Tropme-L’oeil track pants feature a cropped exposed boxer built above the waistband – a style popularized in hip-hop culture during the ’90s.

According to The Guardian, the Texas-born designer has worn the costumes of Beyoncé, Jennifer Lopez, Tom Hanks, Johnny Depp, and Ryan Gosling among other big names in Hollywood.

He didn’t reveal who his favorite celebrity was, but settled on a more general feeling: “They are the ones who really know themselves. And if they’re working with a stylist, they’re asserting themselves, or the stylist is kind of on the lookout for the things they’ve asked them to find.

“There are these celebrities who have their own sense of style.”

While Ford — whose brand makes more than $1 billion a year — has managed to break away from the culture of cancellation, citing an “obsession with political correctness,” his big-name designer counterparts haven’t had much luck.

A pair of $1,190 Balenciaga track pants caused quite a stir last month after many critics accused the design of being a form of cultural appropriation.

The gray sweats from the prominent Spanish fashion brand was named Trompe-L’oeil and featured a short exposed boxer built above the waistband – a style popularized in hip-hop culture during the ’90s.

It sparked controversy among critics after TikTok user @mr200m__, whose real name is Josiah Hyacinth, posted a video mocking the design at Selfridges on September 2.

Fashion house Dolce & Gabbana was accused of racism in 2018 after an ad campaign featured an Asian model trying to eat Italian food with chopsticks.

Fashion house Dolce & Gabbana was accused of racism in 2018 after an ad campaign featured an Asian model trying to eat Italian food with chopsticks.

This is a racist feeling. “That sounds very racist, you guys,” Sfeir said while checking the pants. “They wove these boxers into the pants.”

In an emailed statement to CNN, Marquita Gammage, associate professor of Africana studies at California State University, Northridge, said she is troubled by the Balenciaga element and what she is witnessing as a ‘black culture hoping for big profits’.

Gammage, author of Cultural Appropriation as Agency Reduction, noted that the style is often “used to criminalize blacks, especially black males, as thugs and a threat to American society.”

Individuals immediately responded to online design, criticizing the fashion brand for revamping another aspect of black culture.

Black men are discriminated against and undervalued for wearing slouchy pants and Balenciaga takes advantage of this style. User @HighestPriestess said about the design on Twitter that it’s crazy how ghetto it is until they put a price on it.

Then in 2019, Gucci faced a culture of cancellation as the top $890 of the brand sparked outrage on Twitter with many claiming it was black game.

Inspired by vintage ski masks, multicolored knitted masks walked the runway, adding a mystical feel to this ensemble. This knit top combines an accessory and a ready-to-wear collection, read product description.

Gucci later apologized for selling the black knitted balaclava top, which is currently on sale at locations like Spring and features a mouth opening marked in red.

“We consider diversity a core value that must be fully supported and respected and at the forefront of every decision we make,” the Italian brand wrote in a statement.

Dolce & Gabbana even canceled their 2018 high-profile runway show in Shanghai, China, due to the culture of cancellation.

The Italian fashion brand has been accused of racism after releasing three videos showing an Asian model trying to eat Italian food with chopsticks.

The controversial piece was a top-selling black knit balaclava for $890 on sites like Spring

It is marked by a mouth opening marked in red

The piece, a black knitted balaclava top, sells for $890 on sites like Spring and features a mouth opening highlighted in red.

Gucci took to Twitter to apologize for the jacket and added that diversity is key to the brand

Gucci took to Twitter to apologize for the jacket and added that diversity is key to the brand

Adele has been accused of cultural appropriation for wearing a Jamaican flag bikini and a Bantu necklace for last summer's Notting Hill Carnival.

Adele has been accused of cultural appropriation for wearing a Jamaican flag bikini and a Bantu necklace for last summer’s Notting Hill Carnival.

The videos were meant to promote her new DG Loves China campaign and were captioned as follows: ‘Welcome to Episode 1 with Dolce & Gabbana’s Eating with Chopsticks. The first thing for you today is how to use these stick cutlery to eat a great traditional Margherita pizza.

In the aftermath of the incident, screenshots of an alleged altercation with Gabbana went viral on Instagram, with the 57-year-old designer being seen making disrespectful comments about China.

The brand and designer said that their Instagram accounts had been hacked.

Meanwhile, English singer Adele was almost canceled earlier this month when fans attacked her on social media for wearing a bikini bearing the Jamaican flag and holding a bantu in her hair for last summer’s Notting Hill Carnival.

The 33-year-old said she “didn’t read the living room” with her post and admitted that she didn’t remove the photo because it would have meant she was “acting as if it never happened”.

In the photo shared to her Instagram, Adele posed in the garden of her $9.5 million Beverly Hills home while wearing her hair in a Bantu knot – a style native to the Zulu people of South Africa.

Users criticized the choice, calling it “insensitive”. Ernest Owens wrote on Twitter: “If 2020 wasn’t any weirder, Adele gives us the Bantu knot and cultural appropriation nobody asked for. Officially, this indicates that all white women in the pop are a problem. I hate seeing it.

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