HomeStudy finds low-income housing in New York burns more fossil fuels than other states

Study finds low-income housing in New York burns more fossil fuels than other states

An RMI study says that 84 percent of low-income homes in New York depend on piped natural gas, propane or fuel oil for heating, compared to the nationwide average of 54 percent. Burning fossil fuels in homes has been linked to negative health effects, such as asthma.

Genmary Evileye

Children who live in homes with gas stoves are more likely to develop asthma than children who live with electric stoves.

A new study finds that low-income families in New York are still highly dependent on fossil fuels, a trend linked to negative health outcomes.

The report published this month examined data on heating in low-income housing. It found that 84 percent of those homes in New York depended on piped natural gas, propane or fuel oil. That represents the highest percentage of the four states studied, which also included California, Massachusetts and Colorado, and is well above the national average of 54 percent of low-income households using fossil fuels for heating.

The report was compiled by RMI, a nonprofit group promoting clean energy, which noted multiple long- and short-term health effects from burning fossil fuels in homes. For example, children who live in homes with gas stoves are 42 percent more likely to have asthma than children who live with electric stoves.

It also showed that burning fuels in buildings negatively affects neighborhood air quality – a problem that is worsening in sanitation areas, where pollution from highways, plants and waste-transport facilities is already wreaking havoc.

else This year’s study by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health-and later Conceived by RMI—It was found that in 2017 (the year for which the most recent data is available) 1,940 New Yorkers died prematurely from particulate matter that could be linked to burning fossil fuels in buildings. This represents the largest number of deaths among all 50 states and is associated with more than $21 billion in health costs. The majority, or 75 percent of those deaths and health costs, were directly related to residential rather than commercial buildings.

In recent years, New York has sought to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels for cooking and heating. During his State of the City address earlier this year, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that he would seek to Ban gas connections in new construction by 2030.

Two years earlier in 2019, the city council passed Local Ordinance 97, which set ambitious standards for reducing building emissions, including requiring New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) buildings — affordable units available to low-income residents — to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. thermal levels from 2005 levels to 80% by 2050.

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