Norwegian Princess Ingrid Alexandra and Prince Haakon celebrate ten years since the Anders Breivik massacre

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Norwegian Princess Ingrid Alexandra and Prince Haakon celebrate ten years since the Anders Breivik massacre

Norway marked 10 years since Anders Breivik killed 77 people in the country’s worst massacre ever as church bells rang out across the country and Royal family They paid their respects to the victims.

Crown Prince Haakon and Princess Ingrid Alexandra laid a wreath on the island of Utoya while King Harald and Queen Sonja attended a mass in Oslo to memorialize the many victims, mostly teenagers, to mark the decade since the horrific massacre.

On July 22, 2011, far-right Anders Breivik detonated a bomb in the capital, Oslo, killing eight people, before heading to the small island of Utoya where he chased and shot 69 Hezbollah members. Labor PartyYouth wing wearing a police uniform.

Describing himself as a patriotic and hard-line nationalist, Breivik showed no remorse at his 2012 trial, in which he called victims traitors in support of immigration.

His youngest victim was only 14 years old.

Norway’s Crown Prince Haakon and Princess Ingrid Alexandra lay flowers at a memorial as Norway celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Oslo attack and Utoya island.

Princess Ingrid Alexandra was photographed during a memorial service marking the decade since the country's worst peacetime massacre

Princess Ingrid Alexandra was photographed during a memorial service marking the decade since the country’s worst peacetime massacre

People gather next to a memorial outside Oslo Cathedral today for a mass to honor the 77 victims of the horrific attack in 2011.

People gather next to a memorial outside Oslo Cathedral today for a mass to honor the 77 victims of the horrific attack in 2011.

Anders Breivik (pictured in 2017) is being held in prison after eight people were killed in a bomb attack in Oslo before killing 69 others.

Anders Breivik (pictured in 2017) is being held in prison after eight people were killed in a bomb attack in Oslo before he shot 69 more.

Events were held across the country today, including a Mass at Oslo Cathedral which ended with the first jingle of bells. Thousands gathered in the streets outside to mourn the 77 victims.

Arriving on crutches, 84-year-old King Harald sat in his service seat beside Queen Sonja at the front of Oslo Cathedral as the country observed a minute of silence.

Speaking before 77 roses arranged in the shape of a heart, Jens Stoltenberg, Prime Minister of Norway at the time of the attacks in 2011, told worshipers that 10 years ago we met hate with love, but hate still exists. “

At the time of the attacks, Breivik claimed to be the leader of a secret Christian military order plotting an anti-Muslim revolution in Europe, but later described himself as a traditional neo-Nazi praying to the Viking god Odin.

Stoltenberg, now NATO Secretary General, said Breivik was “one of us”.

The perpetrator was a right-wing extremist. Misuse of Christian symbols. He grew up on our streets, belongs to the same religion and has the same skin color as the majority in this country. He was one of us, said Stoltenberg.

Norway's Crown Prince Mette-Marit (left) and Princess Ingrid Alexandra (right) attend a memorial service on Thursday

Norway’s Crown Prince Mette-Marit (left) and Princess Ingrid Alexandra (right) attend a memorial service on Thursday

Flowers were laid at the memorial on July 22 on the island of Utoya near Oslo where Breivik killed several members of the Labor Party's youth wing.

Flowers were laid at the memorial on July 22 on the island of Utoya near Oslo where Breivik killed several members of the Labor Party’s youth wing.

Norway's King Harald and Queen Sonja attend a mass at Oslo Cathedral to mark 10 years since the country's worst peacetime attack.

Norway’s King Harald and Queen Sonja attend a mass at Oslo Cathedral to mark 10 years since the country’s worst peacetime attack.

Norway's Crown Prince Haakon (left) and Bishop Jan Otto Mersith (right) pictured outside Hall Church where the victims were honored today

Norway’s Crown Prince Haakon (left) and Bishop Jan Otto Mersith (right) pictured outside Hall Church where the victims were honored today

Events were held across the country today, including a Mass at Oslo Cathedral that ended with the first jingle of bells

Events were held across the country today, including a Mass at Oslo Cathedral that ended with the first jingle of bells.

But none of us respects democracy. He is one of those who believe they have the right to kill for their political goals.

Across the country, people listened as emotional survivors read aloud the names of the 77 victims at a televised memorial event.

Some of the victims’ parents pondered the way the state handled the massacre, saying that “time does not heal all wounds.”

Breivik was convicted of mass murder and terrorism in 2012 and sentenced to 21 years in prison, which can be extended as long as he was considered a danger to society.

Legal experts say he could be jailed for life.

“(Victims) will be proud of how we reacted after the terror and how the rule of law stood,” said Lisbeth Kristen Rwenyaland, whose daughter Sen was killed by Breivik. Roeyneland now runs the National Support Group for Victims and Families.

Norway's Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit attend a memorial service in the government district

Norway’s Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit attend a memorial service in the government district

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg watches after giving his speech during a memorial service at Oslo Cathedral

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg watches after giving his speech during a memorial service at Oslo Cathedral

From left, Raymond Johanssen, Peggy Hessen, Thorburn Jagland, Prime Minister Erna Solberg, Jonas Gahr Støre, Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit at

From left, Raymond Johansson, Peggy Hessen, Thorburn Jagland, Prime Minister Erna Solberg, Jonas Gahr Store, Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit honor flowers

Arriving on crutches, 84-year-old King Harald sat in his service seat next to Queen Sonja at the front of Oslo Cathedral as the country observed a minute of silence.

Arriving on crutches, 84-year-old King Harald sat in his service seat next to Queen Sonja at the front of Oslo Cathedral as the country observed a minute of silence.

What would those of us who were killed so brutally and unjustly think of us now, 10 years later? ‘I think it would be sad to know that there are still survivors and bereaved people with great needs,’ said Rwenyaland.

“I think they will be disappointed because they see that the public debate has moved in the wrong direction in many ways,” she added. I also think they would be proud of us. We are proud of how we reacted in the days after the terrorist attack and how our nation under the rule of law stood firm in the face of brutality.

“We have not stopped the hate,” said Astrid Hoem, a survivor from Utoya who now leads the AUF, the youth wing of the centre-left Workers’ Party, urging Norway to continue to confront racism in the country.

“It’s so brutal it can be hard to understand,” Hoym said. But it is our responsibility to do so. Because 10 years later, we have to tell the truth. We did not stop the hate. Far-right extremism is still alive. The terrorist was one of us.

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, Crown Prince Haakon, Crown Princess Mette-Marit, Young Workers' Association (AUF) leader Astrid Hoem, and support group leader Lisbeth Kristen Rwenell attend a memorial service.

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, Crown Prince Haakon, Crown Princess Mette-Marit, Young Workers’ Association (AUF) leader Astrid Hoem, and support group leader Lisbeth Kristen Rwenell attend a memorial service.

Across the country, people listened as emotional survivors read aloud the names of the 77 victims at a televised memorial event

Some families of the victims talked about the way the state dealt with the massacre, and said that time does not heal all wounds.

Some families of the victims talked about the way the state dealt with the massacre, and said that time does not heal all wounds.

She was speaking to a group of mourners, including Crown Prince Haakon, Prime Minister Erna Solberg, survivors and families of the victims.

Solberg said it was painful to rethink the “dark July day” and added: “We must not leave hate unchallenged.”

“The terrorist attack on July 22 was an attack on our democracy,” said Solberg, Norway’s prime minister since 2013. It was a politically motivated act of terrorism towards the Labor Party, the AUF and their ideas. But it was not just an attack on a political movement. It hit an entire nation. But we got up again. But Norway has changed through an experience that continues to cause pain.

King Harald was expected to address a memorial service in Oslo later Thursday. He was to be joined by former and current prime ministers and leaders of the youth wing of the Labor Party. The events will also take place in Utoya.

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