National Day of Mourning was held next to Plymouth Rock on Thanksgiving Day

For more than 50 years, indigenous peoples have used Thanksgiving Day to make their suffering known throughout history. Days after Plymouth celebrated the 400th anniversary of Thanksgiving between pilgrims and Native Americans, a large group of protesters showed up at Plymouth Rock to get their message out. There were drums and dancing on the hill overlooking the Plymouth Rock monument as hundreds of people gathered for what they call a National Day of Mourning. Thursday’s audience was one of the biggest attendees for the event at Plymouth Rock. After speeches and prayers, the group marched through the streets led by the grandson of the man who founded the event in 1970. Kisha James says she does not mind people gathering, eating turkey and thanking, but she does not want them to celebrate what she calls the Thanksgiving myth that the pilgrims and Wampanoag came together. “We know it’s simply not true that the pilgrims came and immediately started killing Wamponoag,” James said. Marchere also called for more emphasis to be placed on the cases of missing native women and the return of all land colonized in America. “We are not saying give it back and get off,” said Rebecca Lodgepole, one of the marchers. “We say, give it back so we can heal it so we can all come to some form of reconciliation.” The organizers said they are encouraged to see people from many different backgrounds participate this year, and said the day of mourning is also a day to be proud that after 400 years they and their culture still exist.

For more than 50 years, indigenous peoples have used Thanksgiving Day to make their suffering known throughout history.

Days after Plymouth celebrated the 400th anniversary of Thanksgiving between pilgrims and Native Americans, a large group of protesters showed up at Plymouth Rock to get their message out.

There were drums and dancing on the hill overlooking the Plymouth Rock monument as hundreds of people gathered for what they call a national day of mourning.

Thursday’s audience was one of the biggest attendees for the event at Plymouth Rock.

national day mourning plymouth rock protest at Thanksgiving

After speeches and prayers, the group marched through the streets led by the grandson of the man who founded the event in 1970.

Kisha James says she does not mind people gathering, eating turkey and thanking, but she does not want them to celebrate what she calls the Thanksgiving myth that the pilgrims and Wampanoag came together.

“We know it’s simply not true that the pilgrims came and immediately started killing Wamponoag,” James said.

Marchere also called for more emphasis to be placed on the cases of missing native women and the return of all land colonized in America.

national day mourning plymouth rock protest at Thanksgiving

“We are not saying give it back and get off,” said Rebecca Lodgepole, one of the marchers. “We say, give it back so we can heal it so we can all come to some kind of reconciliation.”

The organizers said they are encouraged to see people from many different backgrounds participate this year, saying that mourning day is also a day where one can be proud that after 400 years they and their culture still exist.

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