‘Frostbit Boy’ rescued from drowning by dolphins in 12-hour ordeal stranded at sea

A man rescued by dolphins after a 12-hour sea ordeal has been revealed as a ‘Frostbite Boy’.

Rory McSurley, 24, became stuck two and a half miles offshore in the icy waters of Tralee Bay and was rescued Sunday in what an NAC volunteer called a “miracle”.

He rose to fame in 2015 in a viral video, which garnered more than 3.5 million views in just a few days, in which he was interviewed as a teenager on his way to school making his way through snowy conditions.

His thick, comical Irish accent attracted crowd attention after the interview was aired with UTV, in which he explained ‘It won’t take long to get frosty’ in the hilarious clip.

The Irish Independent He revealed the swimmer’s identity on Wednesday and explained that he feels “100%” after such a frightening ordeal.

Rory McSurley, 24 (pictured) became stuck two and a half miles offshore in the icy waters of Tralee Bay and was rescued on Sunday in what an RNLI volunteer described as a ‘miracle’.

The man, suffering from hypothermia and fatigue, said he tried to swim more than 5 miles off the coast of Castlegregory Beach in southwest Ireland to Mucklaghmore Rock.

The man, suffering from hypothermia and fatigue, said he tried to swim more than 5 miles off the coast of Castlegregory Beach in southwest Ireland to Mucklaghmore Rock.

Rowery was pulled out of the frigid waters by the Fenit RNLI lifeboat at 8.30pm on Sunday, with the help of a group of dolphins that the lifeboat crew believed helped him.

The hypothermic and exhausted man, from the village of Park in Comdere, said he tried to swim more than five miles off the coast of Castlegregory Beach in southwest Ireland to Mucklaghmore Rock, but was not quite prepared.

He was found more than 12 hours after his launch, wearing nothing but a pair of light swim trunks and surrounded by dolphins, thanks to RNLI coxswain Finbarr O’Connell’s excellent knowledge of the tidal waves in the bay.

Speaking of the lifeguards, he said: “They are very professional and very stoic. They are amazing people, I must say. They are not like doctors or paramedics – paid professionals. They are volunteers. They are definitely an amazing group of people, no doubt.

Fenit RNLI volunteer Jackie Murphy said it was a “miracle” that the man survived the ordeal, and credited O’Connell with saving him thanks to his ability to calculate a swimmer’s likely situation.

Coxswain Finbarr O'Connell, the man credited with saving the swimmer, stands left next to the Fenit RNLI teammates

Coxswain Finbarr O’Connell, the man credited with saving the swimmer, stands left next to the Fenit RNLI teammates

The man was rescued two and a half miles off the coast of Tralee Bay in southwestern Ireland after spending 12 hours in icy waters.

The man was rescued two and a half miles off the coast of Tralee Bay in southwestern Ireland after spending 12 hours in icy waters.

The man’s rescue came after crews from the Fenit RNLI and R118 Coast Guard conducted an extensive search and rescue operation across Tralee Bay, according to the Irish Independent.

A Facebook post from the station Fenit Lifeboat said the Irish Coast Guard requested a rescue mission at 11am after the swimmer’s clothes were discovered on the beach.

The search operation was called off several hours later in the afternoon, but was reactivated at 6 p.m. as helicopters joined the lifeboats to aid in the search.

Fenit RNLI said the crew spotted “a group of dolphins two and a half miles from Castlegregory Beach,” which led them to spot the desperate swimmer.

The crew pulled the man, still incredibly conscious, out of the water and brought him to shore, where an ambulance greeted him and he was immediately taken to hospital.

“He was very, very lucky,” RNLI Coxswain O’Connell said. No doubt about this. Another half hour, and he was perished.

We were all literally over (how he survived), he wasn’t wearing a wetsuit, nothing.

His body temperature was extremely low. road fell. The paramedics were astonished with him. It’s really unbelievable.

Coxswin O’Connell also made a point in noting dolphins that were said to have floated the swimmer but not acted aggressively, possibly in an effort to protect him or bring him back to safety.

“There were a lot of dolphins,” he said. “Maybe they helped him somehow – who knows?”

RNLI crew said they spotted a group of dolphins two and a half miles from Castlegregory Beach, prompting them to spot the desperate swimmer

RNLI crew said they spotted a group of dolphins two and a half miles from Castlegregory Beach, prompting them to spot the desperate swimmer.

Rescuers who first saw the man when they arrived at the scene thought they had spotted a seal drifting in the water, but the hypothermic and exhausted swimmer managed to raise his arm to signal for help.

“It was a great, great moment for us,” O’Connell said.

The exhilaration of seeing someone floating alive in the water, and not vice versa, is very great.

We’ve had a lot of bad results, so it was very nice to take him.

Usually we go out, and that might not be a positive. We are all happy.

Fenit RNLI Lifeboat Operations Director Gerard O’Donnell echoed Coxwin O’Connell’s rejoicing in finding and saving the swimmer, but warned of the dangers of swimming in the sea.

Even at this time of year, the water can be very cold. When the lifeboat crew found [the swimmer] They were a good distance from the beach and were exhausted.

O’Donnell advised anyone who goes swimming to take all necessary precautions and let people know where to go and when to expect to return to avoid being stranded for long periods of time.

Water Safety Ireland is urging people who go ashore or sea kayaking to take a dip in their depths after the accident.

Many people are swimming for the first time this year and have not taken swimming lessons for more than 15 months.

Swimming in a stream is a lifesaver. Other than that, swimming areas that are locally known to be safe and where there are ring buoys for rescue operations.

Make sure the water’s edge is shallow so that you can get in and out safely.

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