Five Benefits of Conducting Mind Mapping Activities

On Wednesday morning I published a long list of tools that students can use to create mind maps, visual maps and flow charts. What I didn’t include in this blog post was a description of the differences between the three. I haven’t even outlined the benefits of mind mapping that students can experience. The purpose of this post is to explain the difference between mind maps and conceptual maps, as well as to list some of the benefits of a complete student mind mapping activity. Mind Maps vs. Imaginary Maps.
The digital mind mapping process begins with a keyword or term placed in the middle of the screen. Often, the keyword or term is represented by an image or icon. From this key word or term, students add lines to connect other words, terms, or ideas that they associate with the key word or term. Images and icons can be used to represent related words and terms. Students can use a variety of fonts and line colors and sizes to indicate the relationship or similarity between words and terms in their mind maps. Finally, with the exception of one keyword or term from which all ideas emerge, the mind map does not need to be categorized, nor should it be used as a diagnostic tool.

While there are similarities between conceptual maps and mind maps, there are significant differences. First, a concept map often has a hierarchical structure that is used to show the connections and classes of the larger concept. Second, when using a hierarchical structure for imaginary maps, it is possible to make incorrect connections there. For example, a student draws a conceptual map of the seasons of the year that it would be wrong to have “leaf-changing colors” as a “winter” branch instead of a “autumn” branch.

Five Benefits of Conducting Mind Mapping Activities

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.