HomeExpelled from Marines after criticizing superiors for getting out of Afghanistan warns army needs ‘revolution’

Expelled from Marines after criticizing superiors for getting out of Afghanistan warns army needs ‘revolution’

The Marine Corps commander who was relieved of his duty to warn his superiors from above Afghanistan The exit strategy says he will achieve “accountability” and that the military “needs a revolution”.

Lieutenant Colonel Stewart Schiller spoke for the first time since his dismissal in new comments on New York Post.

Schiller posted a video on Facebook calling on Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley and others not to ‘raise their hands and accept accountability or say, ‘We screwed this up’.

“The baby boom role is over,” Schiller told the New York Post on Saturday. I demand accountability, at all levels. If we don’t get it, I get it.

The Marines also recalled former President Thomas Jefferson’s saying, “Every generation needs a revolution.”

Marine Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Stiller said in a widely shared video that military leaders need to take responsibility for the failed and deadly evacuation from Afghanistan.

Follow-up to the video where Schiller said he was relieved of his duty

Follow up on the video where Schiller said he was relieved of his duty

In another Facebook post, he claimed that some of his fellow officers urged him to delete the video, despite his agreement with him.

In another Facebook post, he claimed that some of his fellow officers urged him to delete the video, despite his agreement with him.

The New York Post also spoke with Schiller’s family and the Marines he served with, who praised his “courage” to speak out.

Juan Chavez, 33, served under Schiller from 2011 to 2014 and described him as a “fantastic leader” and “a breath of fresh air” in comments to the New York Post.

“It takes real courage to do what he did and that was Stowe all the way,” Chavez said.

His father, Stuart Schiller Sr. described him as the “real deal” and “a Marine” who worshiped his grandfather, a World War II vet who landed on a beach in Normandy.

“He put his life on the line with his fellow Marines, so putting his career on the line like this doesn’t surprise us,” said the proud father.

He added, “He’s still on the battlefield to protect his men and women. It’s interesting that no one (in the military) has responded to his call for accountability. Their response has been to fire him I think. It’s a sad day for America.”

Schiller was relieved of his duties as battalion commander after an impressive 17-year career.  I've been fighting for 17 years.  I'm ready to get rid of everything to say to my senior leaders, "I demand accountability,"' He said

Schiller was relieved of his duties as battalion commander after an impressive 17-year career. I’ve been fighting for 17 years. And he said I’d get rid of everything to say to my senior leaders, “I demand accountability.”

Schiller previously said he won’t speak to reporters until the Marines leave. It was not immediately clear if and when Schiller would leave the army.

In another Facebook post, he claimed that some of his fellow officers urged him to delete the video, despite his agreement with him.

“Obviously I didn’t put it down,” Schiller wrote.

I’ll show this: we can’t be wrong. If you agree…then step up. They only have power because we allow it. What if we all demand accountability?

Schiller posted the controversial five-minute video on Facebook and LinkedIn.

“The reason people are upset on social media right now is not because the Marines on the battlefield let someone down,” Schiller said in the video.

“People are upset that their top leaders let them down. None of them raise their hand and accept accountability or say, ‘We screwed this up’.”

The video had been shared on Facebook more than 23,000 times by Friday evening and had more than 3,100 comments, most of them supporting Schiller’s courage to speak out.

It is not known that an active-duty Marine Corps commander publicly ripped apart senior military leaders and political officials.

In the video, he said he knew he was risking his brilliant 17-year career which included tours of Iraq and Afghanistan by posting the video, but he still faces metaphorical shooting.

I’ve been fighting for 17 years. I am willing to throw it all away to say to my senior leaders, ‘I demand accountability.’

“I think what you believe in can only be determined by what you are willing to risk,” he said. Therefore, I believe it gives me some high morals to demand the same honesty, integrity, and accountability from my senior leaders.

Lieutenant-Colonel Schiller said he had a personal relationship with one of the Marines who died in an ISIS bombing in Khorasan on Thursday and “it is possible that all these people died in vain” if commanders had not taken responsibility for the disaster.

13 US soldiers were killed in the Kabul blast

Max Soviak, 22, a Marine from Berlin Heights, Ohio

Soviak had graduated in 2017 from Edison High School, where he played football, according to before eventually moving to Guam.

Soviak described himself on Instagram as a “patriot” and his photos showed that he enjoys an active lifestyle on boats, beaches and mountains.

He was also proud of his military service, posting photos with his military colleagues and commenting on photos of his friends.

Riley McCollum, 20, a Marine Corps corporal from Riverton, Wyoming.

McCollum loved the Army since he was three, and at 18 he brought his father Jim enlistment forms for signature.

I love American history, enjoy wrestling, mixed martial arts, and training kids in sports.

His father said McCollum’s goal after the Marines was to become a history teacher and wrestling coach.

He married Jannah Summer 2020, and they have their first child next September.

David Lee Espinosa

Nico cream

Hunter Lopez,

Taylor Hoover,

Jared Schmitz

Ryan Knauss

He said the big strategic mistake was not securing Bagram Air Base before evacuating people.

Instead, the US relied on the Kabul airport as the only way out of the country.

On Friday, military experts identified the sudden withdrawal of US forces from Bagram on July 2 as the moment the US abandoned Afghanistan.

In a follow-up letter later on Friday, he said he had been relieved of his duties.

Major Jim Stinger, a Marine Corps spokesperson, told DailyMail.com in a statement that Lt. Col. Stuart Schiller had been relieved of command by Col. David Emile, commandant of the Eastern Infantry School, “due to a loss of confidence and confidence in his ability to lead.

This is clearly an emotional time for many Marines, and we encourage anyone who is struggling now to seek advice or speak to a fellow Marine. “There is a forum where Navy leaders can address their differences with the chain of command, but it’s not social media,” Major Stinger said.

“My chain of command is doing exactly what I would have done if I were in their place,” Stiller said in a Facebook post, the Marine Corps commander said in a Facebook post.

“America has many issues, but it’s my home. It’s where my three sons will become men.”

“America is still a bright light in a haze of chaos. When my career in the Marine Corps ends, I look forward to a fresh start.”

My life’s purpose is to make America the most lethal and effective tool of foreign diplomacy. While my days of handing over violence may be over, I see a new light on the horizon.

Pentagon officials said Friday that there was only one suicide bomber at Kabul airport on Thursday and not two, as previously claimed, adding to confusion about the attack and concerns about the operation on the ground.

General Hank Taylor said at a Friday briefing: “I can confirm that we do not believe there was a second explosion at or near the Baron Hotel. It was a single suicide bomber. The confusion of very dynamic events can confuse information.”

He did not say whether the bomb that exploded was a car bomb or a car bomb in Sitra. Both were described Thursday on the ground and by officials in Washington. The Pentagon press secretary, John Kirby, was among those who confirmed both explosions.

In the same briefing on Friday, Kirby revealed that thousands of terrorists from ISIS-Khorasan, the group responsible for the airport attack, escaped from Bagram prison earlier this summer after Biden’s forces withdrew from the base in July, making them outnumbered. Afghan forces to supervise them.

The prisoners were photographed being released by the Taliban on August 15.

Thirteen US soldiers were killed along with 170 Afghans at the airport on Thursday when a single suicide bomber detonated his belt. The first four are named; Navy Medic Max Soviak, Marines Riley McCollum, David Lee Espinosa and Karim Nicoy.

Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Schiller criticizes leaders in the Pentagon after the Kabul attack

The reason people are outraged on social media right now isn’t because the Marines on the battlefield let someone down. People are upset because their top leaders let them down. None of them raise their hand and accept accountability or say: ‘We screwed this up’.

I’m not saying we need to stay in Afghanistan forever, but I’m saying, have any of you thrown your rank on the table and said, ‘Hey, it’s a bad idea to evacuate Bagram Air Base, a strategic air base, before everyone else is evacuated?’ Did anyone do that? And when you didn’t think about doing it, did someone raise their hand and say, “We totally screwed this up”? “

I’ve been fighting for 17 years. I am willing to get rid of everything to say to my senior leaders, ‘I demand accountability’.

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